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Core Course GPA Calculation Questions


Your Core Courses GPA is calculated based on the academic courses in one or a combination of these areas: English, mathematics, natural/physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. How does the Core Course GPA differ from your high school GPA? Learn the answer to this question and many more, so you stay on track and take the correct courses.

How is my core course GPA calculated? Your core-course GPA is the average of your best grades achieved for all required core courses. If you have taken extra core courses, those courses will be used in your GPA, only if they improve your GPA.
Can weighted grades for honors or advanced-placement courses be factored into the calculation of the student's core GPA? A school's normal practice of weighting honors or advanced courses may be used, as long as the weighting is used for computing GPAs. Weighting cannot be used if the high school weights grades for the purpose of determining class rank.
How is the NCAA core GPA different from a student's overall GPA? The NCAA core-course GPA is calculated using only NCAA-approved core courses in the required number of core units. High school GPAs generally include the grades from most or all courses attempted in grades 9-12.

To determine the points you earn for each course, multiply the quality points (listed below) for the grade by the amount of credit earned.
Use this scale:
A – 4 points
B – 3 points
C – 2 points
D – 1 point
The NCAA Eligibility Center does not use plus or minus grades when figuring your core-course grade-point average. Focus on the letter grade to calculate your core-course GPA. For example, grades of B+, B and B- will each be worth 3 quality points.

DIVISION I (16 Core Courses)
4 years of English
3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)
1 year of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science
2 years of social science
4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or comparative religion/philosophy)

DIVISION II (16 Core Courses)
3 years of English
2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher)
2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school)
3 year of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science
2 years of social science
4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or comparative religion/philosophy)

*Beginning August 1, 2016, NCAA Division I will require 10 core courses to be completed prior to the seventh semester (seven of the 10 must be a combination of English, math or natural or physical science that meet the distribution requirements below). These 10 courses become "locked in" at the start of the seventh semester and cannot be retaken for grade improvement. It will be possible for a Division I college-bound student-athlete to still receive athletics aid and the ability to practice with the team if he or she fails to meet the 10 course requirement, but would not be able to compete.

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